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Track Listing:

1
Tristano - A Soft Shell Groove
2
Stravinsky - Le Sacre du Printemps / Part 1: The Adoration of the Earth
3
Stravinsky - Le Sacre du Printemps / Part 2: The Sacrifice
4
Rimsky-Korsakov Scheherazade, Op. 35 - The Story of the Calendar Prince
5
Ravel - La Valse

Alice Sarah Ott | Francesco Tristano :

Scandale


RISING STARS ALICE SARA OTT
AND FRANCESCO TRISTANO
PUT A TWIST ON CLASSICAL MUSIC
WITH NEW ALBUM, SCANDALE

FEATURING WORKS FROM
IGOR STRAVINSKY, MAURICE RAVEL, AND NIKOLAI RIMSKY-KORSAKOV

ON DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON

Pianist Alice Sara Ott joins young musician and composer Francesco Tristano on the newly released album, Scandale, titled as an allusion to the Russian impresario Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (1872 – 1929). Focusing on the major theater scandals of the twentieth century, Scandale is a pianistic conversation between two artists set against the diverse backdrop of the music they love.

Diaghilev was a man ahead of his time who chose to pick up the latest trends often ignored by his contemporaries. He turned himself into the ambassador for Russian art in the West, and in 1901 founded the legendary Ballets Russes. Diaghilev had a close working relationship with Igor Stravinsky, Maurice Ravel and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Many of the ballets he produced to their music caused public outrage, however he knew that this was the only way his ambitious projects could command universal attention.

"Back then people stood on their seats and booed", enthuses Alice Ott, "That was what Diaghilev wanted - to move away from what was conventional and bourgeois. And that can definitely happen today too. We can demonstrate with these pieces that classical music is not as conservative as many people think." 

From Ravel's La Valse to Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps, Tristano and Ott succeed in showing the utmost respect for all the works they play on Scandale, while at the same time moving away from classical music's instinctive reverence for the original and trust to their own vision. They both approach their instrument, the piano, and the pieces from a dance perspective.

For Tristano, who is involved not only with classical but also with many forms of contemporary electronic music, the dance-like character of the piano is a pivotal aspect of his playing. "Music is timeless", says Tristano, "but it also has the power to re-invent itself. Classical music functions differently from a lot of other musical genres."