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Andris Nelsons - Boston Symphony

Shostakovich - Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11

Deutsche Grammophon

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One-on-One with BSO Music Director Andris Nelsons
Andris Nelsons leads first BSO rehearsal
The BSO and Andris Nelsons announce a new partnrship with Deutsche Grammophon
1 Shostakovich Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43 / Allegretto poco moderato 14:56  
2 Presto 11:47  
3 Moderato con moto 8:24  
4 Largo 6:52  
5 Allegro 22:25  
6 Shostakovich Symphony No. 11 in G Minor, Op. 103 / The Palace Square (Adagio) 17:15  
7 The Ninth of January (Allegro - Adagio - Allegro - Adagio) 18:46  
8 Eternal Memory (Adagio) 12:28  
9 The Tocsin (Allegro non troppo)  
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The Boston Symphony Orchestra and its Music Director Andris Nelsons will release the latest instalment in their Grammy Award-winning cycle of Shostakovich's symphonies on Deutsche Grammophon – Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11, two works that highlight the composer's life-threatening relationship with Stalin and the Soviet régime. The album is set for international release on July 6.

Raised in Latvia during the Soviet Union's dying years, Andris Nelsons acknowledges that the political conditions under which Shostakovich worked inevitably influenced his compositions – yet his music transcends the circumstances of its creation.

 "I want to distance myself from the political situation," the conductor comments. "Yes, I would say that the Fourth Symphony shows a big protest against what the Soviet Composers Union expected as a style of music. At the same time, Shostakovich was very interested in music from other countries. He was looking behind the political curtain, which is what music should do. His friends and colleagues advised him not to perform the work, because it would risk his life, which is why he put it away for over twenty years. The Fourth Symphony shows the direction he would have taken if he had not been accused of being an anti-communistic composer. Performing it now, we see how it stands apart from politics. It's a masterpiece by a genius that speaks about universal things."

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