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Gidon Kremer|Daniil Trifonov|Giedre Dirvanauskaite: Bio

Among the world's leading violinists, Gidon Kremer has perhaps pursued the most unconventional career. He was born on 27 February 1947 in Riga, Latvia, and began studying at the age of four with his father and grandfather, both distinguished string players. At the age of seven, he enrolled as a student at Riga Music School where he made rapid progress, and at sixteen he was awarded the First Prize of the Latvian Republic. Two years later he began his studies with David Oistrakh at the Moscow Conservatory. Gidon Kremer went on to win a series of prestigious awards, including prizes in the 1967 Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels and 1969 Montreal International Music Competition and first prize in both the 1969 Paganini and 1970 Tchaikovsky International Competitions.

It was from this secure platform of study and success that Gidon Kremer launched his distinguished career. Over the past five decades he has established and sustained a worldwide reputation as one of the most original and compelling artists of his generation. He has appeared on almost every major concert stage as recitalist and with the most celebrated orchestras of Europe and North America, and has worked with many of the greatest conductors of the past half century.

Gidon Kremer's repertoire is unusually wide and strikingly varied. It encompasses the full span of classical and romantic masterworks for violin, together with music by such leading twentieth and twenty-first century composers as Berg, Henze and Stockhausen. He has also championed the work of living Russian and Eastern European composers and has performed many important new compositions by them, several of which have been dedicated to him. His name is closely associated with such composers as Alfred Schnittke, Arvo Pärt, Giya Kancheli, Sofia Gubaidulina, Valentin Silvestrov, Luigi Nono, Edison Denisov, Aribert Reimann, Peteris Vasks, John Adams, Victor Kissine, Michael Nyman, Philip Glass, Leonid Desyatnikov and Astor Piazzolla, whose works he performs in ways that respect tradition while being fully alive to their freshness and originality. It is fair to say that no other soloist of comparable international stature has done more to promote the cause of contemporary composers and new music for violin.

An exceptionally prolific recording artist, Gidon Kremer has made over 120 albums. Many of these have received prestigious international awards and prizes in recognition of his exceptional interpretative insights. The artist's list of awards includes, among many others, the Grand prix du Disque, the Deutscher Schallplattenpreis, the Ernst von Siemens Musikpreis, the Bundesverdienstkreuz, the Premio dell' Accademia Musicale Chigiana, the Triumph Prize 2000 (Moscow), the Unesco Prize in 2001, the Saeculum Glashütte Original MusikFestspielPreis from Dresden in 2007, the Rolf Schock Prize for the Musical Arts from Stockholm in 2008, the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Istanbul Music Festival in 2010, and the Una Vita Nella Musica – Artur Rubinstein Prize from Venice in 2011. In 2016 Gidon Kremer has received a Praemium Imperiale prize that is widely considered to be the Nobel Prize of music.

In 1997 Maestro Kremer founded Kremerata Baltica chamber orchestra to foster outstanding young musicians from the three Baltic States – Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. The ensemble and its founder have toured extensively together over the past two decades, appearing at the world's leading festivals and concert venues. They have also recorded two dozen albums for the Teldec, Nonesuch, Burleske, Deutsche Grammophon and ECM labels. During 2016-17 they will jointly celebrate the ensemble's 20th anniversary and Maestro Kremer's 70th birthday year with extensive tours of the United States, Europe and the Far East. The violinist will also appear as a concerto soloist with, among others, the Philharmonisches Staatsorchester Hamburg and Kent Nagano, the Berliner Philharmoniker and Christian Thielemann, the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Juanjo Mena, and the National Symphony Orchestra and Christoph Eschenbach.

In February 2002 Gidon Kremer and Kremerata Baltica received the Grammy Award in the "Best Small Ensemble Performance" category for After Mozart on Nonesuch; the album was awarded an ECHO Klassik later that year. Their 2014 release on ECM of works by Mieczysław Weinberg was nominated for a Grammy in 2015.

In 2015 Deutsche Grammophon released New Seasons, comprising Gidon Kremer and Kremerata Baltica's recording of Philip Glass's Violin Concerto No 2, The American Four Seasons, and works by Pärt, Kancheli and Shigeru Umebayashi. Their latest album, issued on ECM in October 2015 to mark Giya Kancheli's 80th birthday year, pairs the Georgian composer's Chiaroscuro for violin, string orchestra and percussion and Twilight for two violins and string orchestra, with Maestro Kremer and Patricia Kopatchinskaja as soloists. Both titles attracted high critical praise and a substantial international audience within weeks of their release.

Gidon Kremer plays an instrument made by Nicola Amati in 1641. He is the author of four books, of which the latest is Letters to a Young Pianist (2013). These writings have been translated into many languages and reflect the breadth of his artistic pursuits and aesthetic outlook.
 

"Hearing Trifonov is like having a deep-tissue massage: you keep wanting to pull away from the sheer intensity of it, and you come out feeling as if your reality had been slightly altered. His recital [was a knockout] . . ."Washington Post, January 2013

Moments before Daniil Trifonov performs, profound silence invariably takes possession of his audience. Its intensity depends not on concert hall convention; rather, it arises naturally from the Russian pianist's power to transcend the mundane and communicate music's timeless capacity to bind communities together. Out of that silence comes a rare kind of music-making. "What he does with his hands is technically incredible," observed one commentator shortly after Trifonov's triumph in the final of the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 2011. "It's also his touch – he has tenderness and also the demonic element. I never heard anything like that." That view was expressed not by a professional critic but by one of the world's greatest pianists, Martha Argerich. She concluded that her young colleague was in possession of "everything and more", an opinion that has since been boldly underlined in print, online and over the airwaves by a succession of previewers and reviewers. The Washington Post wrote of the "visceral experience" of hearing Trifonov's playing; the Süddeutsche Zeitung, meanwhile, described his debut concert at last year's Verbier Festival as "a real culture shock", such was its blend of poetic insight, wit, nuance and inventive brilliance.

"The moment I signed to Deutsche Grammophon is, of course, perhaps the most significant event in my life to date" In February 2013, Deutsche Grammophon announced the signing of an exclusive recording agreement with Daniil Trifonov. His debut recital for the yellow label, recorded live at Carnegie Hall, combines Liszt's formidable Sonata in B minor, Scriabin's Sonata No. 2 in G-sharp Minor Op. 19, the "Sonata-Fantasy", and Chopin's 24 Preludes Op. 28. Future plans include concerto albums and further recital recordings. "The moment I signed to Deutsche Grammophon is, of course, perhaps the most significant event in my life to date," he recalls. "It's the greatest honour to record my first CD for the label, especially in such a great hall as Carnegie Hall."

Since winning the Tchaikovsky Competition, Trifonov has travelled the world as recitalist and concerto soloist. His list of credits include debut recitals at Carnegie Hall, Wigmore Hall, the Berlin Philharmonie, London's Queen Elizabeth Hall, the Auditorium du Louvre in Paris, Tokyo's Opera City, the Zurich Tonhalle and a host of other leading venues. He has also appeared with the Vienna Philharmonic, the London Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, the Philharmonia, the Mariinsky Orchestra, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the Cleveland Orchestra. Forthcoming debuts include concerto performances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony and the Moscow Philharmonic.

For all the demands of his busy performance schedule, Trifonov still finds time to study with Sergei Babayan and take composition lessons at the Cleveland Institute of Music. "I'm looking forward to future projects with Deutsche Grammophon," he says. Exploring the vast piano literature, he adds, is the work of a lifetime. "In the coming years I hope to learn as many new pieces as possible and also leave time for composition, as composing partly influences piano playing."

"I was going to a piano lesson. It was winter and very slippery, so I fell down and broke my arm and could not play normally for more than three weeks." Daniil Trifonov was born in Nizhny Novgorod on 5 March 1991. The old system of Soviet communism and the once mighty Union of Soviet Socialist Republics had been dissolved by the time Daniil's parents, both of them professional musicians, celebrated their son's first birthday. For all the social and economic upheavals of the time, the Trifonovs recognised their son's prodigious musical talents and supported his formal training. "I started playing piano when I was five and was also composing and always playing some concerts," Daniil recalls. He gave his first performance with orchestra at the age of eight, an occasion etched in the soloist's memory by the loss of one of his baby teeth midway through the concert. "It was quite an experience! But the first understanding of how important piano playing is for me came when I broke my left arm at the age of 13. I was going to a piano lesson. It was winter and very slippery, so I fell down and broke my arm and could not play normally for more than three weeks."

Physical injury focused young Daniil's mind on what making music meant to him. It also heightened his emotional connection to the piano and its repertoire. Scriabin's impassioned music – mystical, transcendent and technically demanding – became a near-obsession of Trifonov's early teens. The composer's harmonic language and vibrant tone colours touched the aspiring performer's soul and inspired him to enter Moscow's Fourth International Scriabin Competition, where the 17-year-old secured fifth prize. Inspiration also flowed from Trifonov's study of historic recordings of great pianists, which he borrowed from his teacher Tatiana Zelikman at Moscow's famous Gnessin School of Music. "When I was studying with Tatiana Zelikman in Moscow she had a great collection of old recordings and a lot of LPs, so I was fed by those recordings." Trifonov absorbed lasting lessons from the recorded legacy of Rachmaninov, Cortot, Horowitz, Friedman, Sofronitsky and other representatives of a golden age of pianism. "Among pianists who inspire me nowadays are Martha Argerich, Grigory Sokolov and Radu Lupu," he adds.

"Mr Trifonov has scintillating technique and a virtuosic flair," noted the New York Times. "He is also a thoughtful artist . . . [who] can play with soft-spoken delicacy, not what you associate with competition conquerors." Daniil Trifonov himself became an inspiration in the summer of 2011. He began by winning the 13th Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition in Tel-Aviv before returning home to secure first prize, the Gold Medal, and Grand Prix at the XIV International Tchaikovsky Competition. Trifonov also won the Audience Award and the Award for the best performance of a Mozart concerto. His work was already known to influential critics and concert promoters thanks to his appearance a year earlier at the prestigious International Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw. The media's broad and deep response to his Moscow victory guaranteed that the whole world knew about the 20-year-old Russian. "Mr Trifonov has scintillating technique and a virtuosic flair," noted the New York Times. "He is also a thoughtful artist . . . [who] can play with soft-spoken delicacy, not what you associate with competition conquerors." At the beginning of 2012, cultural commentator Norman Lebrecht heralded the young man's meteoric progress and neatly described him as "A pianist for the rest of our lives"

 

Giedrė Dirvanauskaitė is a Lithuanian cellist. She is a laureate of several national competitions; attended master classes held by M. Rostropovich, D. Geringas, H. Beyerle, T. Grindenko, and others.

As a soloist G. Dirvanauskaitė has performed with many different chamber and symphony orchestras of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. Giedre Dirvanauskaite has premiered works of V. Kissine, G. Kancheli, A. Maskats, V. Poleva. She has attended many festivals like Lockenhaus (Austria), Gstaad, Basel (Switzerland), Beppu (Japan), Gohrisch (Germany), December Nights (Russia), and others. Her stage partners include artists like V. Afanassiev, M. Argerich, Y. Bashmet, M. Bekavac, S. Chen, V. Mendelssohn, L. Hagen, H. Holliger, M. Portal, A. Zlabys.

In recent years Giedrė Dirvanauskaitė has extensively toured with many different chamber music formations. Since 2009, she regularly performs and tours in a trio with violinist Gidon Kremer and pianist Khatia Buniatishvili. The latter trio's released record "Kissine/Tchaikovsky: Piano trios" (ECM, 2011) won the prestigious German Critics Award as a recording of exceptional artistry, in addition to receiving praise from all over the world as one of the best recordings of P. Tchaikovsky's works ever made. Other recordings with G. Dirvanauskaitė's solo part include "Hymns and Prayers" – Silent Prayer by G. Kancheli (ECM, 2008), "Between the Waves" – Duo by V. Kissine (ECM, 2013) and 2 CD album released by the label ECM – a homage to a composer Mieczyslaw Weinberg – including his 10 Symphony for strings and String trio for which G. Dirvanauskaitė was nominated for the Gammy award 2015.

In January 2015 Giedrė Dirvanauskaitė toured together with Gidon Kremer and pianist Daniil Trifonov as a trio through USA. She remains to be the leader of violoncello group of the Kremerata Baltica chamber orchestra that she is a member since 1997. Dirvanauskaitė plays an instrument by Alexander Gaglianus, made in 1709.

Described by the Financial Times as an artist who is "able to let the music breathe", Yulianna Avdeeva, who gained international recognition when she won First Prize in the Chopin Competition in 2010, is always uncompromisingly and profoundly devoted purely to the music itself. Conjuring an impeccable combination of clarity, energy and elegance, she wins audiences with compelling honesty, wit and musical judgement.

Avdeeva's artistic integrity is rapidly ensuring her a place amongst the most distinctive artists of her generation. Following her Los Angeles Philharmonic debut with Gustavo Dudamel in May 2019, Avdeeva ventures on a dynamic 2019/20 season which includes debuts with Orchestra Philharmonique de Radio France unter the baton of Santtu-Matias Rouvali, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Marin Alsop, and a return to Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra under Sir Mark Elder's direction. Further highlights include new orchestra collaborations with SWR Symphonieorchester, Gürzenich Orchestra Cologne, Dresden Philharmonic and Sinfonie Orchester Basel. In her native Russia, Avdeeva debuts at Zaryadye Concert Hall, following her recent return to St Petersburg Philharmonic.

A regular performer throughout the Asia-Pacific region, Avdeeva makes her debut with BBC Scottish Symphony and Thomas Dausgaard, joining them for the inaugural BBC Proms Japan in 2019. Most recently, she debuted with Sydney and Melbourne symphony orchestras and worked with New Japan Philharmonic, NHK Symphony Orchestra, as well as with Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin and Bamberger Symphoniker on tours of Japan. Elsewhere, recent highlights have included Avdeeva's debuts at the Salzburg Festival, Alte Oper Frankfurt, Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, Boulez Saal, Lucerne Festival, a tour of Germany with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, engagements with the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Finnish Radio and City of Birmingham symphony orchestras, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra of Moscow Radio, Orchestre symphonique de Montréal, Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia and Orchestre National de Lyon.

Gidon Kremer|Daniil Trifonov|Giedre Dirvanauskaite

Preghiera - Rachmaninov Piano Trios

Deutsche Grammophon

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1 Rachmaninov / Fritz Kreisler: Preghiera  
2 Rachmaninov: Trio elegiaque No. 2 Op. 9 - I Moderato  
3 Rachmaninov: Trio elegiaque No. 2 Op. 9 - II Quasi variazione  
4 Rachmaninov: Trio elegiaque No. 2 Op. 9 - III Allegro risoluto  
5 Rachmaninov: Trio elegiague No. 1  

Gidon Kremer celebrates his 70th birthday on February 27 with a special chamber music program of Rachmaninov's  two piano trios and Fritz Kreisler's transcription for violin and piano of the main theme from Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 2. Kremer personally chose his musical cohorts, pianist Daniil Trifonov and renowned cellist Giedrė Dirvanauskaitė with whom he has close musical and personal relationships. 

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