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Track Listing:

1
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major K 488 ‒ 1. Allegro
 
2
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major K 488 ‒ 2. Adagio
 
3
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major K 488 ‒ 3. Allegro assai
 
4
Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor op. 30 ‒ 1. Allegro ma non tanto
 
5
Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor op. 30 ‒ 2. Intermezzo. Adagio
 
6
Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor op. 30 ‒ 3. Finale. Alla breve
 

Grigory Sokolov :

MOZART RACHMANINOV CONCERTOS - LIVE


LEGENDARY PIANIST GRIGORY SOKOLOV MINES THE ARCHIVES FOR HIS LATEST DG ALBUM, PAIRING TWO LIVE CONCERTO RECORDINGS WITH AN ILLUMINATING DOCUMENTARY

NEW ALBUM RELEASED ON DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON: 10 MARCH 2017

Sokolov's live recordings of Mozart and Rachmaninov's concertos, set for release on 10 March 2017, are not "new" in chronological terms. But they are fresh and likely to remain so, no matter how many times we hear them. The Mozart was made at the 2005 Salzburg Mozart Week and the Rachmaninov dates from a decade earlier, recorded at the Royal Albert Hall during the centenary season of the BBC Proms. "Such is his intensity that Sokolov carries everything and everyone along with him," observed the Salzburger Nachrichten in response to the pianist's reading of K488. TheLondonTimes was equally moved by his account of Rachmaninov's fiendishly difficult Third Concerto, which Sokolov "swept through…like a hurricane." The Independent responded by celebrating "an outstanding performance" by "a major pianistic force."

Sokolov has chosen these acclaimed performances for the third release under his exclusive contract with Deutsche Grammophon. He joined the company in 2014 on condition that it would only issue live albums. "Editing disturbs the balance of things," he observed, in the days when he gave interviews. "Without ‘corrections' my recordings are always better. For me the original is the model, and any change – even a single note – is a distortion." Sokolov's DG deal has enlarged and enhanced the pianist's deliberately small discography, adding two solo recital albums and two concerto performances to a catalog that had been unchanged for twenty years.

Studio retakes and edits are not for Grigory Sokolov: music is something to be made in the present moment, unique and unrepeatable. It is rare for more than a week to pass between his recitals and much rarer to find an unsold ticket for any one of them. Sokolov's way of performing amounts to a spiritual practice, in which every emotion is heightened, every gesture channelled towards the service of something greater than self. There can be no compromise, no consideration other than total immersion in the artworks to hand. That's why Sokolov, hungry for the greatest possible rehearsal time, no longer collaborates with orchestras and conductors. Given that his concerto performances were already few in number by the time he decided to focus exclusively on the solo recital repertoire, these visionary readings of two great concertos by Mozart and Rachmaninov will stand as landmarks of the piano catalog: vital, timeless examples of the art of interpretation.

The spirit of history also touches NadiaZhdanova's film portrait of Sokolov, aptly entitled A Conversation That Never Was and included as a DVD companion to his concerto album. Zhdanova, like so many before her, failed to secure an interview with her film's subject. Yet she constructed a rich portrait of the artist by talking to members of his family, close friends and colleagues, juxtaposing their thoughts with the poetry of Sokolov's late wife, Inna Sokolova, to create a sense of man and artist, myth and reality. One of Zhdanova's interviewees helps explain the magnetic draw of Sokolov's charismatic artistry: "‘If you don't like it, go away' is not the law of a great musician," he notes. "If you don't like it, listen more carefully, try to understand me and you are mine."