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Celebrating Harry Belafonte on his 93rd birthday at 'The Apollo' / THEATERMANIA

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Celebrating Harry Belafonte's 93rd birthday. A celebration of his life and work with special guests: Common, Maxwell, Sheila E., Talib Kweli, Aloe Blacc, Alice Smith, John Forté, Gael Faye, Resistance Revival Chorus, and many more special guests!

American singer, actor, producer, and activist; Harry Belafonte started as key figure in the folk music scene of the 1950s, especially known for popularizing the Caribbean folk songs known as calypsos. He was also involved in various social causes, notably the civil rights movement. Harry became a folk singer, learning songs at the Library of Congress's American folk song archives. He sang Caribbean folk songs as well, in nightclubs and theatres; his handsome appearance added to his appeal as a frequent performer on television variety programs. With hit recordings such as "Day-O (Banana Boat Song)" and "Jamaica Farewell," he initiated a fad for calypso music and became known as the King of Calypso. In the mid-1950s his Harry Belafonte and Mark Twain and Other Folk Favorites were the first of his series of hit folk song albums. During this time he made his Broadway debut, appearing in the musical John Murray Anderson's Almanac (1953–54); for his performance, he won a Tony Award for supporting actor. Later in the decade he starred on the stage in 3 for Tonight and Belafonte at the Palace.

Throughout his career, Belafonte was involved in various causes. He was a supporter of the civil rights movement and a close friend of Martin Luther King, Jr. Belafonte was active in African humanitarian efforts, notably appearing on the charity song "We Are the World" (1985). In 1987 he became a UNICEF goodwill ambassador. He received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 2014.

100% of the net profit to benefit The Popular Democracy Movement Center and the Harry Belafonte 115th St. NY Library.

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