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Jess Gillam's 'Time' mirrors the arc of energy in a passing day and the constant orbit of our existence / Something Else!

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There are few musicians who are collaborating with luminaries such as Michael Nyman, Bjork, Philip Glass, James Blake and Max Richter among others while still in their early 20s. There are also few artists who can play their first concert to a semi-packed, socially distanced concert hall after a six-month hiatus and deliver a performance which felt as if she had played without a break.

Jess Gillam is first a musician but secondly an entertainer. She engages and connects with her audience, and everyone appeared to be captivated at Snape Maltings. Reviewing Time was therefore something I was looking forward to.

In 2019, Jess Gillam became the youngest-ever presenter for BBC Radio 3. Her podcast "This Classical Life" has been nominated for a number of awards including a PRIX Europa in the Radio Music Programme category and the Prix Italia, and won a Gold Award as the Best Specialist Music Programme at the UK Audio and Radio Industry Awards. Her performance at the Last Night of the Proms in 2018 was described as "the indisputable highlight" by BBC News.

Her eclectic choice of classical and re-arranged popular music by artists from Kate Bush to Brian Eno and David Bowie brings not only classical music to a new audience but explores the compositional expertise behind some of our most popular artists, placing them alongside classical composers.

Curated to be experienced as a whole, Jess Gillam's Time mirrors the arc of energy in a passing day and the constant orbit of our existence.

"Last year, I moved to London and quickly became acutely aware of the speed and intensity of life. Everything is in constant orbit: I am orbiting around the world as a musician. There's the orbit of a day, of thoughts around the mind – and I noticed how many people are looking for a place to stop and reflect," Gillam says.

READ THE FULL Something Else REVIEW