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Definitive scholarship, intelligence of production & quality of performance and recording make Sonata Dementia an essential part of Partch, microtonal music / New Music Buff

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Bridge Records is one of those labels whose every release is worth one's attention. Their series of music of Elliott Carter, George Crumb, et al are definitive. And while this listener has yet to hear the first two volumes of the Harry Partch series this third volume suggests that Bridge continues to maintain a high standard as they do in all the releases that I've heard.

Like Philip Glass and Steve Reich would later do, Harry Partch formed his own group of musicians to perform his works. For Glass and Reich they could not find performers who understood and wanted to play their music. For Partch this issue was further complicated by the fact that he needed specially built instruments which musicians had to learn to play to perform the very notes he asked of them.  And keep in mind that Partch managed to do a significant portion of his work during the depression.  He is as important to the history of tonality as Bach, Wagner, and Schoenberg.

I will confess a long term fascination with Partch's music.  Ever since hearing a snippet of Castor and Pollux on that little 7 inch vinyl sampler that came packaged with my prized copy of Switched on Bach I was hooked. With the aforementioned interest/fascination I reached a point where I had pretty much collected and listened to all I could find of Partch's music.  Certainly everything of his had been recorded, right?  Well ain't this a welcome kick in an old collector's slats?  Not only have the folks at Bridge (read John Schneider) found and recorded a heretofore practically known composition but they've done it with a brand of reverence, scholarship, and quality of both recording and performances such that this is a collector's dream and a major contribution to the history of microtonal musics and American music in general.

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