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Track Listing:

1
The Heart Asks Pleasure First
2
Big My Secret
3
Candlefire
4
If
5
Sheep 'n' Tides
6
Goodbye Moortie
7
Fly Drive
8
Diary of Love
9
Time Lapse
10
Odessa Beach
11
The School Room
12
Why?
13
Chasing Sheep is Best Left to Shepherds
14
Deep Sleep Playing
15
The Exchange
16
Here to There
17
Jack
18
Bill
19
The Departure
20
Lost and Found
21
All Imperfect Things
22
The Attraction of the Pedalling Ankle
23
The Mood that Passes Through You
24
The Embrace
25
Silver-Fingered Fling

Valentina Lisitsa :

Chasing Pianos


A coming together of two artists with enormous followings, Ukrainian pianist Valentina Lisitsa celebrates one of Britain's most innovative and popular composers, Michael Nyman, on her latest album for Decca/Universal Music Classics, Chasing Pianos. Slated for release on April 8, 2014, the album will coincide with the 70th birthday of Nyman, featuring music from his soundtracks to well-loved films such as Wonderland and The Piano.

Praised for his music's originality, punchy simplicity and universal appeal, Nyman, during his career as a music critic, coined the term ‘minimalism' for an emergent musical genre – one for which he would make extensive contributions in many of his early scores and inspire a vast global audience.

Quickly becoming a star in her own right, Lisitsa is breaking records in the classical music genre with more than 70 million views and 133,000 subscribers on her YouTube channel. In October 2013, Lisitsa made her New York solo recital solo debut, which The New York Times said, "[Her performance] showed that her success is backed up by enormous talent and technical flair."

Lisitsa's Chasing Pianos is full of irresistible energy and includes all ten solo piano transcriptions from The Piano, together on one album for the first time. Standout tracks include "The Heart asks pleasure first" from The Piano, "Chasing Sheep is best left to Shepherds" from Peter Greenway's The Draughtsman's Contract (1982), "The Departure" from Nyman's Golden Globe-winning score to Gattaca (1997), and the evocative "Time Lapse" from Greenaway's A Zed and Two Noughts (1985).